Uni Koeln mit Schrift small

Log in

Log in

C3/Z2/Z3 Fieldwork 2019: “showers” in the desert

C3/Z2/Z3 Fieldwork 2019: “showers” in the desert

The joint fieldwork of the subprojects C3, Z2 and Z3 in February and March 2019 was successfully completed. We were able to conduct UAV-based flights over several surfaces, in particular with the new and bigger UAV, equipped with specific sensors, including flights over tillandsia sites in the Atacama Desert (see Picture 1). Likewise, we revisited every weather station of our network for control and specific readjustments. All data, metadata, pictures and a visualization tool is available in the weather section of the CRC1211DB (https://www.crc1211db.uni-koeln.de/wd/index.php). After the strong rain events of January and February, we documented surface changes at several locations, and rainfall induced vegetation growth at unexpected places (see Picture 2 & 3).

During our campaign, we carried out several days of fieldwork on zebra stripe-covered hillslopes along the Paposo fault. Using the 10 m2-large irrigation device, we performed irrigation experiments in order to simulate heavy rainfall events, and to provoke overland flow and zebra stripe activity (Pictures 4 & 5). In addition, we carried out extensive morphometric analyses and sampling of zebra stripes (Picture 6). Further work included chronostratigraphical investigations and sediment sampling at a number of hillslope sites between Antofagasta and Pisagua, as well as the installation of soil water content and temperature monitoring sensors, which will capture important data for understanding local environmental conditions on both daily and annual time scales. Time-lapse cameras and a seismometer at one of our zebra stripe sites (aiming at unravelling a seismic shaking-related origin of zebra stripes) complement our monitoring network.

Finally, we carried out irrigation experiments using our (shower cabin-like) small irrigation device (Picture 7) during several days of joint fieldwork together with colleagues from subproject B05. The investigations aim at understanding in-soil colloid transport in different (CRC 1211 transect-related) areas of the Atacama. This work will be continued during the next years.

 

picture1 350pxUAV flight at Tillandsia site.
Photo:
G. Bareth

 

picture2 350pxSwimming pool at Ruta A-75.
Photo:
D. Hoffmeister

 

picture3 350pxFlowers in the desert at weather station 15.
Photo:
D. Hoffmeister

 

picture4 350pxLarge irrigation device at zebra stripe-covered hillslope.
Photo:
GoPro - D. Hoffmeister

 

picture5 350pxProvoked overland flow.
Photo:
GoPro - D. Hoffmeister

 

picture6 350pxSampling at zebra stripe-covered hillslope.
Photo:
S.M. May

 

picture7 350pxShower cabin-like, small irrigation device used for joint fieldwork together with colleagues from subproject B05 for investigations on in-soil colloid transport.
Photo:
D. Hoffmeister


ProjectProjectProject

B2 - three field trips

B2 - three field trips

In the subproject B2 we investigate the evolution of insects in arid environments with emphasis on desert specialist such as the hyperdiverse tenebrionid beetles and silverfish. In the last years, three field trips have been undertaken to gain an overview of the species composition, genetic diversity and colonization history of these insects in the Chilean Atacama. The third field work December 2018/January 2019 completed the survey with an extensive use of pitfall traps along the different sections of the Chilean Atacama (Coastal Cordillera, Central Depression, Precordillera, Altiplano).

A real surprise was the identification of the Gondwanan relict silverfish Maindronia as THE DESERT ANIMAL.  Maindronia was found in hyperarid environments where no other animals could be observed. The first member of a previously undescribed tribe of tenebrionid beetles was found exclusively under salt crusts along salars. This is another example of adaptation to extreme habitats in the Atacama region. We are deciphering the key abiotic and biotic factors that determine(d) the current distribution of such extremophilous taxa in the hyperarid areas of the Atacama. 

 

 

1 First Field trip 2017 Zuniga Ragionieri Blaeser Flores Predel 350pxFirst Field trip 2017 (Zúñiga, Ragionieri, Bläser, Flores, Predel)
Photo:
R. Predel

 

2 Newly described Gyriosomus 350pxNewly described Gyriosomus
Photo:
A. Zúñiga-Reinoso

 

 

3 Trap preparation in the Coastal Cordillera 350pxTrap preparation in the Coastal Cordillera
Photo:
R. Predel

 

4 Home of Maindronia 350pxHome of Maindronia
Photo:
R. Predel

 

5 Home of Lala 350pxHome of Lala
Photo:
R. Predel

 

6 Collecting insects in the Altiplano 350pxCollecting insects in the Altiplano
Photo:
R. Predel

 

7 Psectrascelis hot spot 350pxPsectrascelis hot spot
Photo:
R. Predel

 

8 Happy End 2019 350pxHappy End 2019
Photo:
R. Predel


Project

European Geoscience Assembly 2019

European Geoscience Assembly 2019

With 5,531 oral presentation and 9,432 posters, the EGU General Assembly 2019 was one of the major events among the Geoscience community. Scientist from all over the globe gathered in Vienna to discuss research objectives and exchange ideas.

The CRC 1211 had the great pleasure to host a special session, a poster session and a ‘Townhall Meeting’. The objective of the session was to showcase the CRC research on the mutual evolutionary relationships between Earth surface processes and biota in arid to hyper-arid systems.

The concept of the Townhall meeting was to advertise the CRC to our peers and to facilitate contacts with fellow scientists that could become collaborators in the second phase. Both events were very well received, promoted scientific exchange and led to some great discussions.

 

  • 01
  • 02
  • 03
  • 04
  • 05
  • 06
  • 07
  • 08
  • 09
  • 10
  • 11
  • 12

 

 

CRC 1211 @ the EGU 2019

egu2019 small

GM5.3/BG7.4/CL4.38/PS4.7

Earth - Evolution at the dry limit (co-organized)

Convener: Tibor J. Dunai
Co-conveners: Eduardo Campos , Cristina Dorador , Claudia Knief , Laura Evensta

 

 

egu2019 slider

 

Water is the defining feature of the habitable Earth; it is essential for all life as we know it. Evolution and maintenance of life in extremely water limited environments, which cover significant portions of the Earth, is not well understood. Akin to life, water-driven processes leave unique marks on the Earth’s surface. Mars is the only other planet currently known to bear the marks of water-driven surface processes, albeit fossil and of great age. The slow biotic and abiotic surface processes that may operate even in the virtual absence of liquid water are still essentially unknown. What is evident is that transient episodes of increased water availability can leave long lasting traces in extremely water limited environments. Intriguingly, those traces of bursts in Earth surface evolution have rarely been related to bursts in biological colonization/evolution, and vice versa, although both relate to the same trigger: water.

The objective of this session is to showcase research on the mutual evolutionary relationships between Earth surface processes and biota in arid to hyper-arid systems, where both biota and Earth surface process are severely and predominantly limited by the availability of water (rather than by extreme temperatures).

 

Solicited topics include (not exhaustive):

  • fingerprints of biological activity at the (water) limit of the habitable Earth
  • surface processes operating in the (virtual) absence of liquid water on Earth or extraterrestrial analogues (e.g. Mars)
  • thresholds for biological colonization and concurrent fluvial transformation of landscapes
  • tipping point(s) of biotically and abiotically controlled Earth surface systems
  • chronometric and spatial information on the colonization and radiation of biota terrestrial climatic records of (hyper-) arid regions on Earth

 

10 Jan 2019, 13:00 CET is the deadline for receipt of abstracts

https://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2019/session/30744

 

Page 1 of 8



Contact

  Speaker:
Prof. Dr. Tibor J. Dunai
Institute of Geology and Mineralogy | University of Cologne
Zülpicher Str. 49b | 50674 Cologne
+49 (0)221 470-3229 | tdunai@uni-koeln.de
  Managing Director:
Christian Tiede
Institute of Geology and Mineralogy | University of Cologne

Zülpicher Str. 49b | 50674 Cologne
+49 (0)221 470-89833 | christian.tiede@uni-koeln.de
       
  Deputy Speaker:
Prof. Dr. Martin Melles
Institute of Geology and Mineralogy | University of Cologne

Zülpicher Str. 49a | 50674 Cologne
+49 (0)221 470-2262 | mmelles@uni-koeln.de
  Webmaster:
Tim Schlüter
Institute of Geography | University of Cologne

Otto-Fischer-Str. 4 | 50674 Cologne
+49 (0)221 470-3735 | webmaster@sfb1211.de

DFG logo 200px

       
       
Logo UniKoeln 100px    

logo bonn

 
  RWTH Logo 200px  
  Juelich fz logo 200px